Villa Maya Private Natural Reserve "Description of Jungle Hiking Expedition"

villa maya private natural reserve description of jungle hiking expedition tour excursion in cozumel mexico  

The surroundings of Cozumel’s Villa Maya Private Natural Reserve Jungle has different types of environments can be found during a short walk. It’s possible to encounter various differences in temperature, humidity, soil and plant life. The following various characteristics can be found:

 

Introduction
The macro-relief of the ground in the zone where the reserve and adjacent properties are located is essentially flat with several undulations. The slope of the land is between 1-5 meters. The soil layer is very thin, no more than 5 cm in depth. Underneath the soil lies a layer of limestone with fossils of mollusks and corals. 

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The highest trees reach 10–14m, the bushes to 2–8m, and the herbaceous layer less than 2m. The composition of species varies villa maya privare natural reserve detailed environmental discription of jungle hiking expedition tour excursion in cozumel mexicoin different zones of the reserve. This variety is most noticeable in the low, flooded areas where epiphytes like bromeliads, orchids and cacti, as well as palm trees and vines can be seen.

The areas around Villa Maya encompass areas of vegetation, which are in different degrees of succession. This was occasioned by human activities such as the production of carbon (charcoal), the cultivation of Milpa, which is the traditional agriculture (poly-cultivation of corn-pumpkins-beans, etc.).

Different vegetation and soil zones are found in the same region. Part of the objective of the reserve is a better understanding and knowledge of the habitats; thus, paths within the reserve were designed in order to transect the different vegetation zones.

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Pet kots
According to the Maya Dictionary of Barrera-Vázquez (1980) the meaning of “pet” is round or circular, of “kot” a wall of loose stonesvilla maya natural reserve detailed description of jungle hiking expedition tour sights and things to see in the tropical jungle of cozumel mexicoo (plural: “pet kotoob). They demarcate either a round or square area of sizes ranging up to 24,000 sq m. The stone wall is made of dry laid limestone and its height ranges from 40 - 120cm.

 

 

More About Pet Kots

Identified flora enclosed by pet kots includes a remarkable presence of the well-known group of useful tree and plant species that Mayans (past and present) grow in their backyard gardens and which frequently are dominant of “climax” vegetation in the more humid areas of the Maya region. Specific plants and trees were used as medicine, food, and for the construction of houses. Worth mentioning are the tropical fruit species of AnnonaBrosimumdetailed description of villa maya jungle expedition tour excursion enviromental sights in cozumel mexicoCasimiroaLeucaenaPithcellobiumSpondias andThalisia, and many other useful species such as Bursera simarubaMalmea depressaSabal yapa, Sapindus saponariaVitex gaumeri, plus several others with well known uses.

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Pet kots are believed to be walls that hold artificial forest gardens constructed with “wild” species coming from the local forests or from distant and more humid forests of the Maya region. A major difference with the technique of slash and burn is the absence of annual cultivated plants. Another important difference is the presence in the “pet kotoob” of many species of wild vines, herbs, shrubs and epiphytes which show no evidence of having been introduced.

It seems that pet kots were specifically used as a collection site ofvilla maya private natural reserve detailed description of jungle hiking expedition tour excursions in cozumel mexico useful tree and plant species; the rest was up to nature to lead the way (competition, mortality, new arrivals, regeneration, etc.)

Archeologists believe these walls were also used as a means of orientation in the tropical forests. In dense jungle natural navigation via stars and the sun is not always possible; therefore, the walls became a permanent reference system which allowed future generations to orient themselves in the thick forest.

Another function the walls probably had, was to establish boundaries between the communities of extended families.

Pet kots are still used by rural inhabitants today. On the Yucatan peninsula, limestone walls are being used as pens to enclose domesticated animals such as pigs or chickens.

It is clear that trees and multipurpose forests were an indispensable part of the subsistence systems of many ancient societies, as were also the usual edible crops. It is also clear that these small patches of man-made rainforests based on useful local species are an appealing additional alternative for modern reforestation and biological conservation projects in the tropics. These artificial forests are the only ones that people in these areas now plant by their own will.

 

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Villa Maya Trails
The routes and different paths are designed in three different levels: Primary route, secondary routes, and auxiliary routes. The signs for each route, in accordance with ancient Mayan villa maya private natural reserve detailed description of jungle hiking expedition tour excursion of cozumel mexiconumerology, have been marked with a series of dots. The primary route is in blue. South East of the reserve, there is a rectangular in shape and encompasses a perimeter and indicates the relative position of each side (W), (S), (E), (N). The signs and trails are blue in color and placed along the route (•).

There are three secondary routes. Secondary routes are marked in orange (••), (•••), (••••). And they follow the pre - hispanic walls in some cases.

The auxiliary routes are marked in yellow (•),(••),(•••), linking either primary to secondary, or secondary to secondary routes.  Ease way to walk through the jungle.

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Medium tropical dry forest
This area of the reserve has its location at the entrance of the property, where the cabañas are, this is at the north west in the most elevated ground. And has an undulating profile. At this location a total of 22 different plant species have been registered. The vegetation has a height of 8–14m. The most frequent and abundant species that is distributed in this area is Sabal mayarum or Bursera simaruba. Epiphytes are not found in this area and there is a low density of bushes and vines.  Genus Bursera simaruba.: 

Medium Tropical Dry Forest egetation:

Medium tropical dry forest vegetation:


FAMILY

SCIENTIFIC NAME

BIOLOGICAL FORM

MAYAN USE

ANACARDIACEAE

Metopium brownei

Tree

M, Me, C, other

APOCYNACEAE

Thevetia gaumeri

Bush/Tree

O, Me

ARECACEA

Sabal mayarum

Palm

C, Me

BURSERACEAE

Bursera simaruba

Tree

Me, M

FABACEAE

Piscidia piscipula

Tree

C, F, M, Me

FABACEAE

Swartzia cubensis

Tree

C, Me

LAURAREAE

Nectandra coriacea

Tree

 

MALVACEAE

Hampea trilobata

Bush/Tree

M, Me

MORACEAE

Ficus tecolutensis

Tree

F, Me, other

MYRTACEAE

Psidium sartorianum

Tree

 

MYRTACEAE

Eugenia sp

Tree

 

NYCTAGINACEAE

Pisonia auleata

Climbing Plant

Me, Mel

POLYGONACEAE

Coccoloba acapulcensis

Tree

C

POLYGONACEAE

Coccoloba cozumelensis

Tree

C

RUBIACEAE

Randia aculeata

Bush

Me

RUBIACEAE

Randia longiloba

Bush

S, Me

RUBIACEAE

Guettarda combsii

Tree

C, L

RUTACEAE

Amyris elemifera

Tree

 

SAPINDACEAE

Thouinia paucidentata

Tree

C, Me, Mel

SAPOTACEAE

Manilkara zapota

Tree

Co, M, C, T

SAPOTACEAE

Sideroxylon foetidisimum

Tree

Co

VERBENACEAE

Vitex gaumeri

Tree

C, F, M, S

F = Fodder for animals; M = Timber-yielding; Mel = Honey-yielding; T = Dye; C = Construction; O = Ornamental; L = Firewood; Co = Edible; S = Sacred (magical or religious); Me = Medicinal; Tr = Food or drink container.

 

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Secondary Vegetation
South of the cabañas, secondary vegetation of only ten years old, is in the process of regeneration. Here, milpa was grown after Hurricane Gilbert (Sept. 19, 1989). The vegetation has a height of 3–6 m. Commonly found species are: Senna racemosa, Piscidia piscipula, Swartzia cubensis and vines of the genus Serjania sp.
Following the cleared path to the east, the land slopes between 4–5m downward over a length of 100 meters. The vegetation association is a low forest with flooded areas, essentially without epiphytes, except for the occasional individual of the genus Eugenia sp. which has adapted to the salty environment. This zone ends at arrival to the primary route •W. Genus Eugenia sp. : 

BOOK VILLA MAYA JUNGLE HIKING EXPEDITION 

WEST
The first thirty meters of this route flood slightly during the main rainy season. The low tropical forest has a height between 8–9m. Some epiphytes are found in the top of a Ficus tecolutensis. There are orchids (Oncidium carthagenense) and ferns. Individuals of the orchid-specie Catasetum integerrimumgrow on the ground, just as individuals of Psidium sartorianum. The most common species found in this route are: Gliricidia sepium, Vitex gaumeri, Malpighia rosea, Malpighia glabra, Manilkara zapota, Coccoloba acapulcensis, and some individuals of wild pineapple, which has edible fruit.

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SOUTH
The height of general trees along the •S route are between 9–12m. Fan palms are well represented. The most frequent species aside from fan palms are: Manilkara zapota, Vitex gaumeri, Coccoloba acapulcensis, Piscidia piscipula, Cnidoscolus aconitifolius, Lysiloma latisiliquum, Metopium brownei, Gymnopodium floribundum, Samyda yucatanensis, Thevetia gaumeri and individuals of the family Rubiaceae. The vegetation in the central part of the route is dense with many bushes and vines. Many members of the bromeliad family including Bromelia pinguin and Aechmea bracteata, grow on the tree called Gymnopodium floribundum. There are only a few small flooded areas. Wild guavas are dispersed throughout.

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EAST
In general the vegetation is not dense. The most common species are: Lysiloma latisiliquum, Metopium brownei, Coccoloba acapulcensis, Manilkara zapota, Vitex gaumeri, Ficus tecolutensis and Cordia dodecandra. There are two seasonally flooded areas. The first one is encountered at the entrance of route  •••• Orange, the second at the end of route ·E. Various Thillandsia bromeliads can be seen.

The highest trees can be found in the middle part of the route; they reach a height of 8–10m. The species encountered here are: Jatropha gaumeri, Gymnopodium floribundum, Thouinia paucidentata, Thevetia gaumeri, and Malpighia glabra.

Learn More About the EAST

In the final part line of sight is approximately 10 to 15m. There is a representative of climbing cactus specie. Seasonally flooded areas with epiphytes

although there are other areas that seasonally flood and contain epiphytes, bromeliads and orchids are more concentrated at the sites discussed here. Similar to the rest of the flooded areas found in the reserve, here ground is stony and vegetation sparse.

Majority of Cozumel’s vegetation is characterized by medium and low tropical dry forest.

Life zones of tropical dry forest are defined as frost-free areas where the mean annual temperature is above 17°C; mean annual rainfall ranges from 250-2,000mm, and the annual ratio of potential evapo-transpiration to precipitation exceeds unity.

The low tropical dry forests on the island are distributed between the mangrove areas and medium tropical dry forests. Their distribution areas are very narrow and are represented along the east side of the island. The compositions of the species are very similar to that of the medium tropical dry forests. They are not as high, however.

Medium tropical dry forests occupy most of Cozumel Island. This large area is composed of three different layers of plants: trees, bushes and herbs.

Most common are: Manilkara zapota, Vitex gaumeri, Lysiloma latisiliquum, Bursera simaruba, Piscidia piscipula, Metopium brownei, Plumeria obtusa, Gymnopodium floribundum, Randiaaculeata, Sabal mayarum, Coccothrinax readii and Thevetia gaumeri. Abundant are vines, and epiphytes such asRyncholaelia digbyana, Tillandsia fasciculata, Tillandsia streptophylla, Catasetum integerrimum, Brassavola nodosa, Myrmecophila tibicinis and Encyclia belizensis.

 

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CENOTE
After continuing on •W, one comes to the (fresh-water) cenote area. A cenote is a natural karst sinkhole with water at the bottom. The cenote is 6m wide and 10m long and creates a humid environment. Surrounded by the tropical dry forest, the cenote is edged by many ferns, palm trees, fungus, cacti as well as other species found in humid sites. The cenote itself is home to fish, turtles and other aquatic creatures. Different types of birds can be observed as they visit the cenote in search of water.

Cenote Vegetation:

Cenote Vegetation:


FAMILY

SCIENTIFIC NAME

BIOLOGICAL FORM

MAYAN USE

ANACARDIACEAE

Metopium brownei

Tree

M, Me, C, other

ARECACEA

Sabal mayarum

Palm

C, Me

ARECACEA

Chamaedora neuroclamys

Palm

O

BROMELIACEAE

Bromelia pinguin

Herb

Co

BURSERACEAE

Bursera simaruba

Herb

Me, M

FABACEAE

Piscidia piscipula

Tree

C, F, M, Me

MALPIGHIACEAE

Malpighia rosea

Bush

Co, L

MORACEAE

Ficus tecolutensis

Tree

F, Me other

MORACEAE

Cecropia obtusifolia

Bush/Tree

Me, C, M, other

MYRTACEAE

Eugenia sp.

Tree

 

POLYPODIACEAE

Achrostichum danaeifolium

Bush

Me, Co

RUTACEAE

Casimiroa tetrameria

Tree

Me

STERCULIACEAE

Guazuma ulmifolia

Tree

Me, F, C

VERBENACEAE

Vitex gaumeri

Tree

C, F, M, S

F = Fodder for animals; M = Timber-yielding; Mel = Honey-yielding; T = Dye; C = Construction; O = Ornamental; L = Firewood; Co = Edible; S = Sacred (magical or religious); Me = Medicinal; Tr = Food or drink container.

 

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BROMELIADS
The bromeliad zone is located on the •••• Orange route. Bromeliads such as Tillandsia fasciculata andTillandsia streptophilla prevail over orchids. Again, the terrain is rocky, of a boggy nature, and often floods to a depth of 10 to 30cm. The vegetation is not dense, with the trees distributed in a uniform manner and a height of 4 to 6m. The distance of horizontal vision is approximately 50m. The species seen in this area are: Malpighia rosea which is abundant and Plumeria obtusa which is not so commonly found, and an individual of the Erythrina standleyana and Randia longiloba.

Bromeliad Area Vegetation:

Bromeliad area vegetation:


FAMILY

CIENTIFIC NAME

BIOLOGICAL FORM

MAYAN USE

APOCYNACEAE

Plumeria obtusa

Bush/Tree

O

BROMELIACEAE

Aechmea bracteata

Herbal epiphyte

O, Co

BROMELIACEAE

Tillandsia fasciculata

Herbal epiphyte

O, Me

BROMELIACEAE

Tillandsia streptophylla

Herbal epiphyte

O, Me

BROMELIACEAE

Bromelia pinguin

Herb

Co

BURSERACEAE

Bursera simaruba

Tree

Me, M

FABACEAE

Erythrina standleyana

Tree

Co, Me, O

MALPIGHIACEAE

Malpighia rosea

Tree

Co, L

MYRTACEAE

Eugenia sp.

Tree

 

POLYGONACEAE

Gymnopodium floribundum

Tree

Mel, L, Me

POLYGONACEAE

Coccoloba cozumelensis

Tree

C

RUBIACEAE

Randia longiloba

Bush

S, Me

SAPOTACEAE

Manilkara zapota

Tree

Co, M, C, T

TEOPHRASTACEAE

Jacquinia aurantiaca

Bush

Me

F = Fodder for animals; M = Timber-yielding; Mel = Honey-yielding; T = Dye; C = Construction; O = Ornamental; L = Firewood; Co = Edible; S = Sacred (magical or religious); Me = Medicinal; Tr = Food or drink container.

 

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ORCHIDS
Located along the •N route are several flooded areas of various sizes, depending on the amount of rainfall (4 to 6m in diameter). There is a total of 32 species registered in this area Common species are:Manilkara zapota, Vitex gaumeri, Rhacoma crosopetalum, Coccoloba acapulcensis, Plumeria obtusa, with a height of 5 to 9 m, and individuals of the families Myrtaceae and Rubiaceae. Notable is the larger quantity of especially orchids, but also bromeliads, in this area, which points out there is a bigger humidity compared to other sites in Villa Maya. A specific detail is that the specie Crescentia cujete is only distributed in this zone of the reserve. Coccothrinax readii is present in this site, it has a large dispersion range in the reserve. Observed species of epiphytes are the bromeliads Tillandsia fasciculata, Tillandsia streptophylla (on the tree Erythroxylum confusum), and the orchids Brassavola nodosa, Myrmecophila Tibicinis, Catasetum integerrimum, Encyclia belizensis and Ryncholaelia digbyana. The cactus-specie Selenicereus hondurensis is seen too. Ferns are found on rocks.

Orchid Area Vegetation:

Orchid area vegetation:


FAMILY

SCIENTIFIC NAME

BIOLOGICAL FORM

MAYAN USE

ANACARDIACEAE

Metopium brownei

Tree

M, Me, C, other

APOCYNACEAE

Plumeria obtusa

Bush/Tree

O

ARECACEA

Coccothrinax readii

Palm

C, O

BIGNONIACEAE

Crescentia cujete

Tree

Tr, Me

BORAGINACEAE

Cordia dodecandra

Bush/Tree

C, Co, M, Me, O

BROMELIACEAE

Tillandsia fasciculata

Herbal epiphyte

O, Me

BROMELIACEAE

Tillandsia streptophylla

Herbal epiphyte

O, Me

BURSERACEAE

Bursera simaruba

Tree

Me, M

CACTACEAE

Selenicereus hondurensis

Climbing cactus

O,Me

ERYTHROXILACEAE

Erythroxylum confusum

Tree

C

EUPHORBIACEAE

Jatropha gaumeri

Bush

Me

FABACEAE

Gliricidia sepium

Tree

F, Me

FABACEAE

Lysiloma latisiliquum

Tree

C, M, other

FABACEAE

Erythrina standleyana

Tree

Co, Me, O

GUTTIFEREA

Clusia salvinii

Tree

Me

MALPIGHIACEAE

Malpighia rosea

Tree

Co, L

MORACEAE

Ficus tecolutensis

Tree

F, Me, other

MORACEAE

Brosimum alicastrum

Tree

F, Co, Me, C

MYRTACEAE

Eugenia sp

Tree

 

ORCHIDACEAE

Catasetum integerrimum

Herbal epiphyte

O, Me

ORCHIDACEAE

Brassavola nodosa

Herbal epiphyte

O

ORCHIDACEAE

Encyclia belizensis

Herbal epiphyte

O

ORCHIDACEAE

Ryncholaelia digbyana

Herbal epiphyte

O

ORCHIDACEAE

Myrmecophila tibicinis

Herbal epiphyte

O

POLYGONACEAE

Gymnopodium floribundum

Tree

Mel, L, Me

POLYGONACEAE

Coccoloba cozumelensis

Tree

C

RUBIACEAE

Randia aculeata

Bush

Me

RUBIACEAE

Randia longiloba

Bush

S, Me

RUTACEAE

Casimiroa tetrameria

Tree

Me

SAPOTACEAE

Manilkara zapota

Tree

Co, M, C, T

TEOPHRASTACEAE

Jacquinia aurantiaca

Bush

Me

VERBENACEAE

Vitex gaumeri

Tree

C, F, M, S

F = Fodder for animals; M = Timber-yielding; Mel = Honey-yielding; T = Dye; C = Construction; O = Ornamental; L = Firewood; Co = Edible; S = Sacred (magical or religious); Me = Medicinal; Tr = Food or drink container

 

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PALMS
Due to humidity and nature of the soil, Coccothrinax readii is well represented along the biggest part of •S, and in the south of •• orange and ••• orange. Vegetation is of medium height (up to 11m) and dense. Palms are between 50cm and 6m in height and between 3-8 and 30-50 years old. The most frequent species aside Coccothrinax readii are: Gymnopodium floribundum, Randia longiloba,, Vitex gaumeri, Piscidia piscipula, and Metopium brownei. Various specimen of Bromelia pinguin are seen.

Palm Area Vegetation:

Palm area vegetation:


FAMILY

SCIENTIFIC NAME

BIOLOGICAL FORM

MAYAN USE

ANACANTHACEAE

Metopium brownei

Tree

M, Me, C, other

APOCYNACEAE

Plumeria obtusa

Bush/Tree

O

ARECACEA

Coccothrinax readii

Tree

 

BORAGINACEAE

Cordia dodecandra

Bush/Tree

Co, M, C, Me, O

BROMELIACEAE

Aechmea bracteata

Herbal epiphyte

O, Co

BROMELIACEAE

Bromelia pinguin

Herbal epiphyte

Co

BURSERACEAE

Bursera simaruba

Tree

Me, M

CACTACEAE

Selenicereus hondurensis

Climbing cactus

O, Me

EUPHORBIACEAE

Jatropha gaumeri

Bush

Me

EUPHORBIACEAE

Cnidoscolus aconitifolius

Bush

Me

FABACEAE

Gliricidia sepium

Tree

F, Co

FABACEAE

Lysiloma latisiliquum

Tree

T, L, F

FABACEAE

Piscidia piscipula

Tree

C,F, M, Me

LAURACEAE

Nectandra coriaceae

Tree

 

MORACEAE

Ficus tecolutensis

Tree

Me, F, other

MYRTACEAE

Eugenia sp

Tree

 

POLYGONACEAE

Gymnopodium floribundum

Tree

Mel, L, Me

POLYGONACEAE

Coccoloba cozumelensis

Tree

C

POLYPODIACEAE

Polypodium lycopodioides

Herb

O, Me

RUBIACEAE

Randia longiloba

Bush

S, Me

RUTACEAE

Amyris elemifera

Tree

 

SAPOTACEAE

Manilkara zapota

Tree

Co, M, C, T

VERBENACEAE

Vitex gaumeri

Tree

C, F, M, S

 

 

 

 

F = Fodder for animals; M = Timber-yielding; Mel = Honey-yielding; T = Dye; C = Construction; O = Ornamental; L = Firewood; Co = Edible; S = Sacred (magical or religious); Me = Medicinal; Tr = Food or drink container


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MANGROVES
South east of reserve towards the beach, just before the coastal dune area, there is a mangrove community. Mangrove is a vegetation community that is primarily located in areas that are periodically or permanently flooded with brackish water. The species that compose this community are highly adaptable to different grades of salinity. The ecosystem is characterized by its low-diversity; vegetation of this area is composed primarily of trees of few species. The soil is boggy and has a high concentration of organic matter.

Learn More About Mangroves

Mangroves are of biological and socio-economic importance. Many types of trees found here are used for construction of houses, making of carbon, medicinal application, and to create tannin (used to tan leather). Mangrove swamps often serve as a hatchery and nursery for the larval stages of many brackish and saltwater fish species. Crabs, mussels, snails and other invertebrates find shelter in the red mangroves extensive root system. Herons and other birds often build nests in the branches of the trees and this nutrient-rich community provides food and shelter for many other migratory bird species and mammals. Mangroves also serve as a buffer zone against waves, therefore controlling erosion. The roots help to collect and contain decomposing organic matter, which help to enrich the soil. Mangrove vegetation encompasses almost the entire perimeter of the island. Mangrove swamps flourish in the northwest and southwest of the island. The species characterizing this vegetation community are red, white, black and button mangrove; epiphytes such as bromeliads and orchids are abundant

Mangroves vegetation


FAMILY

SCIENTIFIC NAME

BIOLOGICAL FORM

MAYAN USE

COMBRETACEAE

Conocarpus erectus

Tree

C, L

COMBRETACEAE

Laguncularia racemosa

Tree

 

POLYPODIACEAE

Acrostichum danaeaefolium

Fern

 

RHYZOPHORACEAE

Rhizophora mangle

Tree

C, T, L

THYPHACEAE

Typha domingensis

Herb

 

VERBENACEAE

Avicennia germinans

Tree

C, L

F = Fodder for animals; M = Timber-yielding; Mel = Honey-yielding; T = Dye; C = Construction; O = Ornamental; L = Firewood; Co = Edible; S = Sacred (magical or religious); Me = Medicinal; Tr = Food or drink container

.

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COASTAL DUNE VEGETATION
Cozumel's Coastal Dune vegetation is well represented on the east coast of the island, where sandy and rocky beaches can be found.

Coastal Dune Vegetation:

Coastal dune vegetation


FAMILY

SCIENTIFIC NAME

BIOLOGICAL FORM

MAYAN USE

AIZOACEAE

Sesuvium portulacastrum

Herb

 

AMARYLLIDACEAE

Hymenocallis americana

Herb

 

ARECACEA

Thrinax radiata

Palm

M, C

BORAG

Cordia sebestena

Bush

 

BORAGINACEAE

Tournefortia gnaphalodes

Bush

 

COMPOSITAE

Ambrosia hispida

Herb

Me

COMPOSITAE

Flaveria linearis

Herb

 

CONVOLVULACEAE

Ipomoea pes-caprae

Herb

Me, O

CRUCIFERAE

Cakile edentula

Herb

 

GRAMINEAE

Cenchrus echinatus

Herb

 

POLYGONACEAE

Coccoloba uvifera

Bush

 

SIMAROUBACEAE

Suriana maritima

Bush

 

F = Fodder for animals; M = Timber-yielding; Mel = Honey-yielding; T = Dye; C = Construction; O = Ornamental; L = Firewood; Co = Edible; S = Sacred (magical or religious); Me = Medicinal; Tr = Food or drink container.

 

 

ANIMALS PRESENT IN COZUMEL

Animals Present in Cozumel Island
 

Scientific Name

English Name

Spanish Name

Artibeus intermedius

Bat

Murciélago

Artibeus jamaicensis cozumelae

Bat

Murciélago

Centurio senex

Bat

Murciélago

Dermatura phaeotis

Bat

Murciélago

Glossophaga leachii

Bat

Murciélago de lengua larga

Lasiurus blossevillii

Bat

Murciélago rojo del Oeste

Micronycteris megalotis

Bat

Murciélago

Micronycteris schmidtorum

Bat

Murciélago de orejas largas

Mimon benettii cozumelae

Bat

Murciélago dorado

Molussus ater

Bat

Murciélago de cola libre

Myotis keaysi

Bat

Murciélago

Natalus stramineus

Bat

Murciélago

Nyctinomops laticaudatus

Bat

Murciélago de oreja ancha

Pteronotus parnellii

Bat

Murchiélago

Rhogeessa parvula

Bat

Murciélago

Oryzomys couesi cozumelae

Mouse

Rata arrocera

Peromyscus leucopus cozumelae

Rat

Ratón de patas blancas

Reithrodontomys spectabilis

Rat

Ratón cosechador cozumeleño

Tamandua mexicana

Northern tamandua

Oso hormiguero

Tayasu tajacu

Collared Peccary

Pecari de collar

Urocyon cinereoargenteus

Grey Fox

Zorra gris

Aguoti paca

Agouti

Tepezcuintle/perro de monte

Dasyprocta punctata

Central American Agouti

Aguti

Dasypus novemcinctus

Nine-banded Armadillo

Armadillo

Didelphis virginiana

Common Opossum

Tlacuache

Mazama americana

Brocket Deer

Temazate

Nasua narica nelsoni

Nose-Bear

Pisote/Coatí

Potos flavus

Marten

Martucha

Procyon pygmaeus

Cozumel Raccoon

Mapache Cozumeleño

 

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LIVING ORGANISMS IN COZUMEL

LIVING ORGANISMS IN COZUMEL

Scientific Name

English Name 

Spanish Name

AMPHIBIANS

 

 

Bufo marinus

Common toad

Sapo común

Bufo valliceps

Toad

Sapo

Gastrophryne usta

Frog

Ranita

Hyla microcephala

Frog

Sapito

Smilisca baudini

Common Mexican tree frog

Rana trepadora

REPTILES

 

 

Anolis cristatellus

Anolis lizard

Lagartija anolis

Anolis rodriguezi

Anolis lizard

Lagartija anolis

Anolis sagrei

Anolis lizard

Lagartija anolis

Basiliscus vittatus

Lizard

Teterete

(Cnemidophorus cozumelae)
Aspidoscelis cozumelae

Cozumel Raceruner
Whipetail

Lagartija de cozumel 

Ctenosaura pectinata

Iguana

Garrobo

Ctenosaura similis

Iguana

Iguana rayada

Eumeces schwartezi

 

 

Iguana iguana

Green iguana

Iguana

Mabuya unimarginata

 

 

Thecodactylus rapicaudus

Gecko

Geco patudo / Tolok

SERPENTS

 

 

Boa constrictor

Boa constrictor

Boa

Leptodeira annulata

Snake

Culebra escombrera

Oxybelis fulgidus

Snake

Culebra

Thamnophis proximus

Western ribbon snake

Culebra de agua

TESTUDINES

 

 

Terrapene carolina yucatana
Chelonia midas
Caretta caretta

Turtle
Green turtle
logger head

Tortuga Castaña
Toruga blanca
Caguama

CROCODILES

 

 

Crocodylus acutus

American crocodile

Cocodrilo amarillo

 

 

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